17 Blocks
Michael and Taylor
(”17 Blocks” is briefly mentioned in this.)
(Review Source)
Michael and Taylor
(”17 Blocks” is briefly mentioned in this.)

Ongoing list of titles to consider being in my top ten at the end of the year. (You won't find anything I rated under 3 stars on this list, excluding special circumstances. Additionally if a film was released in 2019 and I'm just now getting to it I will still include it in this list.)

  1. Invisible Life
  2. I Lost My Body
  3. 17 Blocks
  4. Midnight Family
  5. The Fall
  6. The Assistant
  7. The Loudest Voice
  8. Birds of Prey (and the Fantabulous Emancipation of One Harley Quinn)
  9. Underwater
  10. 21 Bridges

...plus 4 more. View the full list on Letterboxd.

(Review Source)
Michael and Taylor

Sprawling chronicle of a Washington D.C. family afflicted by deadly gun violence, terrible grief, and drug abuse, which director Davy Rothbart astutely and compassionately shows as entwined. Cutting footage that spans twenty years down to 96 minutes means that it moves quickly, and to a degree the haste does limit emotional access to the subjects. There also are formal touches, e.g. piano music, the camera drifting around a passed out family member, that add unnecessary sentimentality. But the wounds it exposes are deep and raw, and it reckons with multi-generational struggle while also finding hoping in this family’s strength and resolve.

(Review Source)
Michael and Taylor

A deeply emotional and beautiful documentary covering the experience of a family, a family tragedy, and the future that each member can have. Davy's selection of early moments pay call back dividends few documentaries ever do. The assembled footage and timing of the edits felt just right.

The story is a sadly familiar one. However, the resilience and humanity displayed remind us of our better selves. It's in those tiniest of moments, something as simple as verbal recognition of emotion or confirming the length of a homework sheet. It's a delicate film and an intimate one, if you're a bit more careful with your viewing experience than normal, I'm confident it will become a beautiful piece of humanity you'll bring with you in your collective baggage of cinematic feelings.

(Review Source)
1917
Sword Fisha
1917 is a solid WWI film. It doesn’t have as many cool action scenes as other war films, but it does have several good sequences. The film has a couple of plot twists and includes an unexpected and inglorious death … Continue reading
(Review Source)
Michael and Taylor

This week on the Podcast we discuss our First Impressions of: Saint Maud & First Cow(04:25) and the Titles: 1917(09:11), The Naked Kiss(24:58), and The Steel Helmet(41:19).

Visit us at https://drinkinthemovies.com

 

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(Review Source)
Cranky T-Rex
(Review Source)
Michael and Taylor

Sure 1917 is immersive, daunting, harrowing, physically impressive, and all those other marketing words. But it lacks all semblance of emotionality, there is no thematic transference into the viewer of how this feels or could feel. As an audience member I sat back in observation, not leaning forward in trepidation, expectation, or enthrallment. The audience members I could see were likewise lounging, recling, or laying on top of one another completely separated from any pulse the film carried. Something seems to have been lost in the content in order to execute the tracking shot form. I don't feel good saying that either, Deakins work in Blade Runner 2049 is genuinely some of my favorite cinematography I've experienced and what comes to mind when I envision great cinematography. Which brings up another odd thing I didn't expect to say at the end of the film. It didn't look particularly good (on the Dolby Screen) nor did it have the killer shot(s) I've come to associate with Deakins.

It's certainly worth interfacing with, I just didn't see a whole lot there. If you're just hunting for awesome long take films I'd recommend Long Day's Journey Into Night a film I didn't particularly care for.

(Review Source)
Michael and Taylor

Counterproductive technical proficiency turns the journey with two British soldiers on a high-stakes mission in WW1 into tiresome spectacle that lacks both spontaneity and soul.

(Review Source)
Michael and Taylor

“People never really talk in a movie.”

(Review Source)
21 Bridges
Michael and Taylor
(”21 Bridges” is briefly mentioned in this.)

Big thank you to the Steven Carrier for getting this on my radar. If you don't already, go follow him. He's great.

One of Sienna Miller's most interesting performances, between this and 21 Bridges I'm confident that she'll continue her ascent as she ages and I can't wait.

Crowe, Wallace, and Watts are superb. So much more informative than Bombshell was. I highly recommend it if you're interested in the subject and not well informed. You'll sti have a ton of leg work ahead of you but it's a start.

(Review Source)
Michael and Taylor
(”21 Bridges” is briefly mentioned in this.)

Ongoing list of titles to consider being in my top ten at the end of the year. (You won't find anything I rated under 3 stars on this list, excluding special circumstances. Additionally if a film was released in 2019 and I'm just now getting to it I will still include it in this list.)

  1. Invisible Life
  2. I Lost My Body
  3. 17 Blocks
  4. Midnight Family
  5. The Fall
  6. The Assistant
  7. The Loudest Voice
  8. Birds of Prey (and the Fantabulous Emancipation of One Harley Quinn)
  9. Underwater
  10. 21 Bridges

...plus 4 more. View the full list on Letterboxd.

(Review Source)
Michael and Taylor

I went in with bottom of the barrel expectations and can happily say that it was totally fine. Certainly some of the better modern shoot outs I've seen in this type of picture in the last couple years. I finally went for a Chadwick Boseman performance, Stephan James continues to soar, and Sienna continued to branch out. I've really enjoyed just about half of her projects and am all for seeing her in more of this type of role.

Brian Kirk is a promising director with the right talent around him. I'll definitely be trying to catch his next flick while it's still in theaters. The marketing campaign for this movie did it no favors.

(Review Source)