National Review Staff
(”10 Things I Hate About You” is briefly mentioned in this.)
A review of the film Booksmart.
(Review Source)
Kyle Smith
(”10 Things I Hate About You” is briefly mentioned in this.)
My column on the death of Heath Ledger, from today’s Post: He Stood Out From the Start January 23, 2008 — In the spring of 1999, at the height of the WB-network sensibility that was flooding multiplexes with date comedies for high-school girls, no one was expecting much from “10 Things I Hate About You.” But it was a clever adaptation of “The Taming of the Shrew” that made the most of two newcomers: Julia Stiles and 19-year-old Heath Ledger, who played her long-haired love interest. Ledger was mysterious, cool and witty. Like the early Johnny Depp, he stood out from the Clearasil crowd. He turned down offers to do more teen movies until he was rewarded in 2000 with the plum role of Mel Gibson’s son in “The Patriot.” Ledger proved that he could be the heart of a drama with action-movie shadings. The studios smelled the next blockbuster hero, and Ledger got the full treatment: the cover of Vanity Fair at age 21 and a star turn in the medieval adventure “A Knight’s Tale.” The film flopped, as did another costumer, “The Four Feathers,” the following year. Ledger was freed up to take on low-paid work for arty directors like Terry Gilliam (“The Brothers Grimm”), Catherine Hardwicke (“Lords of Dogtown”) and Marc Forster (“Monsters Ball”). The role of a shepherd who hesitates to acknowledge his homosexuality in “Brokeback Mountain” was exactly what he was looking for, and he gave the performance that made the film. Ledger was brilliant, craggy and conflicted. His inner torment poured out in a hoarse, broken rumble of a speaking voice in which his native Australian accent was undetectable. Worn down by his secret, the character seemed many years older than the actor, who earned what seemed likely to be the first of many Oscar nominations. Ledger continued to shun conventional roles to do, for instance, a harrowing film about heroin addiction (“Candy”) and a small part in the ensemble film about Bob Dylan (“I’m Not There”). Only the promise of working with one of today’s most revered directors, Christopher Nolan, could lure Ledger back to the blockbuster, as the Joker opposite Christian Bale’s Batman, in next summer’s “The Dark Knight.” Posters for the film, showing a hideously disfigured Ledger, are in movie lobbies from coast to coast, macabre reminders of a grim fact: It was his last completed movie.]]>
(Review Source)
The Federalist Staff
(”10 Things I Hate About You” is briefly mentioned in this.)
Let me start my tale of Rev. Martin Luther King Jr.-inspired minor terror by saying I don’t blame any of the black students at Stadium High School for what happened on that day more than 20 years ago. It’s probably not what I would have done, but who knows? They had their reasons and were remarkably restrained, considering. I was taking a public speaking class at Stadium in Tacoma, Washington, later made famous as the set of the movie “Ten Things I Hate About You.” One of our regular assignments was delivering announcements over the building’s PA system: half day tomorrow, school pep rally Thursday night, etc. We also did history bits. It fell to me to mark King’s “I Have a Dream” speech by reading a small excerpt to the whole school. That got me all kinds of excited. “I Have a Dream” is a great speech, whatever your political leanings are. It is intelligent, vivid, and concise, clocking in at under 1,700 words. The speech is also daring. King used his whole bag of tricks to challenge everyone who would hear his poetical words at the National Mall on August 28, 1963, from Southern segregationists to Northern white liberals to would-be black militants. King preached that the American Founders had written a check to all Americans that had long since come due. He put the nation on notice that his great movement meant to cash it without delay. They would meet “police brutality” with “soul force,” and they would triumph. It Was So Inspiring I Had to Try And the words! Listen to how he describes the conflict: “seared in the flames of withering injustice”; “the tranquilizing drug of gradualism”; “the whirlwinds of revolt”; “the high plane of dignity and discipline”; “the jangling discord of our nation”; George Wallace’s lips were “dripping with the words of ‘interposition’ and ‘nullification.’” I reached down deep and found the bass to tell students about ‘my’ dream, ‘deeply rooted in the American dream.’ King even manages to turn American topography into something you want to hear more about: “the mighty mountains of New York”; “the heightening Alleghenies of Pennsylvania”; “the curvaceous slopes of California.” The best way to do King’s speech justice, I naively thought, would be to deliver it in the voice of King himself. After a brief intro, I, a white boy from the Pacific Northwest with our almost accentless English, tried to sound like a well-spoken, booming black preacher from the South. My voice had barely changed at that point, but I reached down deep and found the bass to tell students about “my” dream, “deeply rooted in the American dream.” I quoted the most-quoted part of the speech, of course, where King hopes that “One day on the red hills of Georgia, the sons of former slaves and the sons of former slave owners will be able to sit down together at the table of brotherhood. … One day even in the state of Mississippi, a state sweltering with the heat of injustice, sweltering with the heat of oppression, will be transformed into an oasis of freedom and justice. I have a dream that my four little children will one day live in a nation where they will not be judged by the color of their skin but by the content of their character. I have a dream today!” In the allotted time, I tried to work in some of the preacher’s more blatantly religious language. How often do you get to tell all the students in a public school about a dream in which “every valley shall be exalted, and every hill and mountain shall be made low, and the rough places will be made plain, and the crooked places will be made straight and the glory of the Lord shall be revealed and all flesh shall see it together”? I closed with “the words of the old negro spiritual: Free at last! Free at last! Thank God Almighty we are free at last!” What Happened Next Shocked Me Next period, fishing for a compliment, I asked friend if he’d heard me on the intercom. His answer shocked me. The conversation went something like this: Friend: We all heard it. Me: How did it sound? Do you want to get your ass kicked? Friend: Do you want to get your ass kicked? Me: What? No. What are you talking about? Friend: You just read a Martin Luther King speech sounding like a black person. Me: I was going for more Southern than black, but so what? Friend: And you don’t see a problem with that? Me: No! That’s how King delivered it. Friend: But you’re white. Me: So? Friend: (Shakes head.) I’d watch your back. He had a point, it turned out. That day, African-American students at Stadium kept accidentally bumping into me in the hallways, including one nudging-up-against-a-locker incident. No punches were thrown and no threatening words were exchanged in any of this. Without my friend’s warning, I would have written it off as an unfortunate coincidence. Now that I was paying attention, the repeat collisions and several nasty looks worried me that something far worse was brewing after school. Let’s Get Outta Here That, in turn, created a moral dilemma and a PR nightmare. Fighting was one thing, yet fighting over the legacy of Martin Luther King Jr. seemed extra wrong and perverse. Imagine being known for having instigated The Great “I Have a Dream” Throwdown of 1993 when you were trying to celebrate, not mock, King and you may begin to see my problem. Fighting over the legacy of Martin Luther King Jr. seemed extra wrong. So I got out of there. I called home for a ride to avoid conflict at the bus stop and exited the building by a different route than usual, just to play it extra safe. “What’s going on?” Dad asked when he pulled up into the school turn-around. “Just drive!” I said, easing down in the seat as far as I could. The next school day was the real test. I showed up expecting the worst, but there were no collisions, no thrown elbows, and no locker presses from my fellow black students over the perceived insult. Maybe they worked it out of their systems with the previous day’s hilarious clumsiness, or maybe they thought about it and decided something about King’s message was worth not fighting over. I’ve always wondered which it was. ]]>
(Review Source)
10 Years
John Hanlon
“You don’t have to pretend to like my kids, cheapest ” Cully (Chris Pratt)- a former high school bully- says early on in the new film, 10 Years. But it’s not the importance of ‘forgetting’ that plays a major role in the drama. It’s the... <img src="http://www.johnhanlonreviews.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/09/10-Years-Poster-105x88.jpg" type="image/jpeg"/>
(Review Source)
10,000 BC
Kyle Smith
(”10,000 BC” is briefly mentioned in this.)
Hmm, I wonder what Jon Stewart will joke about on Oscar night? I think I can see it all too clearly…. (Applause) Hey! Whoa! Thanks. No really. You’re too nice. (Wild applause) Come on! You’re making me feel like the Jewish Barack Obama! (Tumultous applause and moderate whoo-hooing.) No, really. It’s great to be here again. For the first time in my life, I think I understand President Bush. You know? Because now I know exactly how it feels to win an entirely undeserved second term. (Wild applause, whistles.) Hey, there’s Amy Adams! I loved “Enchanted.” Didn’t you love it? (Applause). Only guy who didn’t love it? Bill Clinton. He walked out of it saying, “This whole thing is the second biggest fairy tale I’ve ever seen.” (Laughs) Lot of big movies coming out that you’ll be seeing honored at next year’s Oscars. Like, say, “10,000 B.C.” (Laughs). No, really. Great movie. It’s about John McCain’s high school years. (Laughs) No, but really.  There’s a movie coming out about Hillary Clinton’s campaign too. It’s called “Semi-Pro.” (Scattered laughs and boos.) Moving right along. Hey! There’s Michael Moore. How ya doin’. I hear Michael’s making a documentary about Mike Huckabee, by the way. It’s gonna be called “Hicko.” (scattered laughs, uncomfortable silence) What? What’d I say? The man’s a creationist! I mean, really, who could possibly think a guy who doesn’t believe in the theory of evolution could ever get anywhere near being elected president of the United–oh. (Big laughs. Shot of Al Gore in audience. Gore mouths the words “That’s not funny.” Applause.)]]>
(Review Source)
Armond White
(”1001 Arabian Nights” is briefly mentioned in this.)
May his daring at least get Disney’s closed minds to rerelease Song of the South.
(Review Source)
Conservative Film Buff
(”101 Dalmatians” is briefly mentioned in this.)

It’s not every day you watch one of the worst movies you’ve ever seen.

“Titanic: The Legend Goes On” is a Spanish-Italian animated movie that puts a Cinderella story aboard the Titanic. Not only is everything about it bad, it’s also tasteless towards the historical tragedy in the way that it is completely unconcerned with the deaths happening during the sinking. It’s a complete mistake from start to finish.

What struck me most was just how much they wanted to cram in here. Let me list some of the things that are directly stolen from: James Cameron’s Titanic, Cinderella, Lady & the Tramp, 101 Dalmatians, Aristocats, Rescuers, Oliver & Conpany, An American Tale, Looney Tunes, the list goes on. And I don’t just mean there are references, I mean there are major characters that are basically copied and pasted from all these sources. Yes, there are a ton characters.

(Review Source)
The Federalist Staff
(”101 Dalmatians” is briefly mentioned in this.)
In contrast to mediocre Disney remakes, here are ten times the Magic Kingdom managed to reimagine rather than ruin their family entertainment classics.
(Review Source)
PJ Media Staff
Lifestyle class="pages"> https://pjmedia.com/lifestyle/2012/1/13/reimagining-fairy-tales-grimm-once-upon-a-time-and-their-modern-spin-on-fantasy/ ]]>
(Review Source)
11/8/16
Christian Toto
11 8 16 review

Watching “11/8/16” is like scanning Facebook over the past 12 months.

It isn’t pretty.

The documentary, available now via iTunes, select theaters and Netflix, is a revealing look at our

The post ’11/8/16′ Reveals Ugly Side of Hillary Clinton Voters appeared first on Hollywood in Toto.

(Review Source)
12 Angry Men
Kyle Smith
(”12 Angry Men” is briefly mentioned in this.)
A quarter of a century later, The Shawshank Redemption retains its inspirational power.
(Review Source)
PJ Media Staff
Lifestyle var dataLayer = window.dataLayer = window.dataLayer || []; dataLayer.push({ 'videoName': 'Honey, I Shrunk the Kids (1989) Classic Trailer - Rick Moranis Movie HD', 'videoType': 'Curated' }); 10. Honey, I Shrunk the KidsI suppose in one sense, Netflix serves the same purpose as Facebook: perpetual high school reunion and never-ending nostalgia fests, reminders of a time before adulthood and the weight of responsibilities.Nowadays when I go back and watch some film that was fun or memorable from childhood or adolescence I tend to see it more from the parents' perspective, relating to those characters, rather than the kids. I wonder how Honey, I Shrunk the Kids will hold up when rewatching it. Rather than experiencing it as a child wandering through the grass and inner-tubing in a cheerio, I'll consider it as the father searching for his lost children... class="pages"> https://pjmedia.com/lifestyle/2014/7/1/65-movies-shows-come-to-netflix-in-july-here-are-10-you-should-watch/ previous Page 1 of 10 next   ]]>
(Review Source)
PJ Media Staff
Lifestyle var dataLayer = window.dataLayer = window.dataLayer || []; dataLayer.push({ 'videoName': 'Pineapple Express Trailer', 'videoType': 'Curated' }); Anyone who’s ever watched a Seth Rogen movie knows that great comedy can be long on laughs, short on plot. Try to recite the story of Pineapple Express from beginning to end in coherent English and you’ll see what I mean. But paper-thin plotting wasn’t invented in 2008. Ancient Greek comedies made about as much narrative sense as a James Brown interview. Add in 2500 years worth of cultural change, and you get scripts that read like a Japanese knock-off of a Will Ferrell film written by someone on ‘shrooms. Ranked from weirdly confusing to utterly incomprehensible, here are ten ancient plots that made more jokes than sense. var dataLayer = window.dataLayer = window.dataLayer || []; dataLayer.push({ 'videoName': '1988: Is this James Brown's strangest interview ever?', 'videoType': 'Curated' }); class="pages"> https://pjmedia.com/lifestyle/2014/11/20/the-10-most-absurd-plots-from-ancient-comedy/ previous Page 1 of 11 next   ]]>
(Review Source)
Tim Markatos
(”12 Angry Men” is briefly mentioned in this.)
Everyone knows me by now as the resident movie expert, so it will come as a surprise to many of you to learn that just four years ago I was a total film philistine. Were it not for the devious Mr. Alan, Sophomore Honors English and Creative Writing teacher, who forcibly transferred me into his second-semester film class to work on a short screenplay I had written for a final, Tim's love affair with cinema would have remained unconsummated to this day.  In my second week at Georgetown, after the dust from New Student Orientation and the start of classes had settled, I decided to start taking advantage of our library's vast DVD reserves to start catching up on all the movies Mr. Alan and others had been insisting I see. I simultaneously started keeping a journal of every film I watched from that day out, and before long I was in the grips of mankind's primal cataloguing urge, searching out films both near and far, old and new to fill my lazy hours. My Georgetown education happened in a number of places, the classroom being only one of them. In honor of the 300 or so films I devoured throughout my collegiate years, I've picked out 50 pivotal films that will forever define my time here. Some of these movies are good, others atrocious; quality is not the primary criterion for selection so much as capacity for creating fond memories. I deliberately limited myself to movies I watched during the academic calendar year, so while vacation hits like Margaret, Mysteries of Lisbon, Rosetta, and Laurence Anyways (to name a few) made their own indelible marks on my impressionable psyche, this is not the space to speak of those. Part of what makes a moviegoing experience memorable for me is the company I share it with; as you'll see with most of these selections, it's the people you freak out with while leaving the theater who make the endeavor worthwhile.
(Review Source)
The Federalist Staff
(”12 Angry Men” is briefly mentioned in this.)
The Fourth of July shouldn’t be about celebrating warfare or revolution, it should be about celebrating exceptional American freedom.
(Review Source)
The Federalist Staff
For many years now, on Election Day my husband and I have hosted a party, inviting over friends of a similar political persuasion to watch the returns and either celebrate or commiserate, depending on the outcome. In 2012 we went down to defeat but did so in style with a Mitt Romney-themed party complete with our own original cocktail creation: the Mint Rumney. (I see others had the same idea, but with different ingredients. Our Mint Rumney called for mint, pineapple juice, rum, Midori, and cream.) On that fateful night four years ago, as we waited for the results to come in, we muted the TV, pulled out our hymnals, and sang with our guests, fellow Christians who along with us know better than to place our trust in earthly rulers. But this year, for the first time in a very long time, we will not have an election party. As voters who are deeply dissatisfied with both major-party candidates this election, there is little for us to feel hopeful or excited about. Trump or Clinton is going to win, and either way, when we wake up on November 9 we will still have grave concerns about where the country is headed. I mentally and emotionally checked out of this election several weeks ago, seeing little reason to continue adding stress to my days or to relationships with people I care about who have a different view. Why belabor things when we all know what we think? Que sera, sera. So in lieu of an election party, I am now thinking about what to do the evening of November 8 to get my mind off the proceedings. If you, too, are looking for an alternative to sitting glued to your television screen watching returns that promise to be depressing no matter which way they go, here are a few possibilities to consider that will not only provide a distraction but actually benefit and enrich your life for the better. 1. Have Some Friends Over and Sing Together Sadly, Americans don’t sing together anymore. Yet singing has historically been one of the most basic tools human beings have to build community and express their most deeply held hopes and fears. African-American slaves sang spirituals to help them endure their subjugation at the hands of their slaveholders. Churchgoers sing to give voice to their shared confession of faith. In many parts of the world, and even here in America, people still sing together at times of celebration and mourning. What better way to ponder, on Election Day, the things that really matter in life, than to sing? Whether you sing hymns, patriotic songs, popular or folk songs, or all of the above, singing together is a great way to remind yourself that life is about so much more than politics. It’s about loving one another, sharing good times and bad, and upholding the things we cherish and want to pass on to our children. If you aren’t musically inclined and don’t have a friend who can help lead the singing, pick up some CDs, break out the karaoke machine, or pull up some YouTube videos. You will be surprised at how good you feel after a shared time of singing with people you care about. 2. Read the Constitution Throw in the Declaration of Independence, some Federalist papers, and Patrick Henry’s Speech to the Virginia Convention for good measure. Or if you’re feeling sociable, invite some friends over and tell them to bring their favorite literary passage, either fiction or non-fiction, that reflects the noblest of America’s values and aspirations, and take turns reading to one another. For even more fun, dress up as the person whose work you have decided to share. After spending the evening bathed in the words of George Washington, James Madison, Phyllis Wheatley, Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, Alexis de Tocqueville, Frederick Douglass, Mark Twain, Robert Frost, and others, you will be reminded of what truly makes America great and inspired to continue clinging to it. 3. Make It Movie NIght Curl up with some popcorn and a classic American-themed movie. For more serious or earnest fare, go with “The Grapes of Wrath,” “Mr. Smith Goes to Washington,” “Glory,” “To Kill a Mockingbird,” or “12 Angry Men.” If you’re in the mood to be inspired, choose “Apollo 13,” “The Right Stuff,” “Miracle,” “Rocky,” or “Independence Day. For a Western, there’s “High Noon” or “Stagecoach,” and for something on the lighter side, “My Fellow Americans,” “Dave,” or “Being There.” And if you feel like some revolutionary singing and dancing, “1776”! 4. Have a Game Night Play American-themed games like Monopoly, Ticket to Ride, Hail to the Chief, Where in the USA Is Carmen Sandiego, or Trivial Pursuit: All-American. Or, if you’re feeling cynical and resigned to living in a banana republic, there’s always Junta. 5. Invite Your Neighbors Over for a Potluck Tell them ahead of time that the goal is to forget the election, so talk of politics is off-limits. Ask everyone to bring an American-themed dish, and spend some quality time getting to know better the people who probably understand a lot more about the challenges of life in your community than all those folks in Washington DC. 6. Restore Your Soul Head for a museum, a park, or a quiet country road and take a nice, long walk, preferably far, far away from the campaign signs, billboards, radio ads, and news reports. 7. Do Something Kind for Someone Visit an elderly neighbor and drop off something sweet to eat. Take a meal to someone who’s sick. Rake your next-door neighbor’s leaves. I don’t care if he has that candidate’s sign in his yard. Rake them anyway. 8. Teach Your Kids American Classics If you have children, spend some time teaching them things about their country that they may not be learning in school these days: the national anthem, the Pledge of Allegiance, and the Preamble to the Constitution. Read or watch some stories about important figures in America’s history: Christopher Columbus, John Smith and Pocahontas, Squanto and the Pilgrims, George Washington, Benjamin Franklin, Sacajawea and Lewis and Clark, Harriet Tubman, Thomas Edison and the Wright brothers. Here are a few resources to consider. 9. Read Your Bible Any part of it will do, but here are a few passages to get you started: Exodus 20, 2 Chronicles 7, Matthew 22, John 19, Acts 5, Romans 8, Colossians 1, 1 Timothy 2, 1 Peter 2, and Psalms 25, 33, 46, 51, 71, 109, and 146. 10. Pray Pray for the unborn, for children, and for the sick, disabled, and elderly. Pray that those in authority over us would carry out their duties with wisdom and humility. Pray that as Americans we would seek what is best not only for ourselves but for each other. Pray for the defeat of those who wish to harm us. Pray for peace. The foregoing list, while written with Election Day in mind, is applicable to any day of the year. If your plan to ignore the returns fails and you succumb to temptation by turning on the tube, I encourage you to file these ideas away for future use. In that case, be prepared to activate Plan B: a well-stocked bar, Election Night drinking guide, jumbo box of tissue, and head-sized bucket of sand. ]]>
(Review Source)
12 Strong
John Hanlon
In some wars, the enemy is easier to identify. In Afghanistan, that doesn't apply.
(Review Source)
Ben Davies
(Review Source)
The Weekly Substandard Podcast

On this latest episode, the Substandard tackles (so to speak!) the playoff picture. JVL soars like an eagle. Vic hates getting interrupted. Sonny recounts his basement-dwelling years. Plus a discussion of post-9/11 war movies and a review of 12 Strong

(Review Source)
The Federalist Staff
‘12 Strong’ is a welcome change from the ‘We’re all to blame’ war movies that leftists in Hollywood crank out.
(Review Source)
Sonny Bunch
12 Strong

BY:

There’s a moment in 12 Strong—a fact-based accounting of the first Special Forces team inserted into Afghanistan following the 9/11 attacks—when the soldiers we’ve been following watch a video of a woman being stoned to death in Afghanistan. It is brutal and ugly but not what one of the men had asked for. “This isn’t intel, it’s motivation,” he says, adding that he doesn’t need motivation. He’s got two collapsed skyscrapers and 3,000 dead Americans worth of motivation.

(Review Source)
Christian Toto
Showcasing the best of the U.S. military.
(Review Source)
Michael Medved

Star Rating: 3.5 Stars
Cast: Chris Hemsworth, Michael Shannon, Michael Peña
Release Date: Friday, January 19, 2018
MPAA Rating: R
Brought to you by www.michaelmedved.com
(Review Source)
Christian Toto
12 strong review chris hemsworth

You may want to Google the story behind “12 Strong” before lining up to see it.

How could a small group of Green Berets strike a blow against the Taliban

The post HiT Movie Reviews: ’12 Strong,’ ‘Forever My Girl’ appeared first on Hollywood in Toto.

(Review Source)
Christian Toto
american-sniper

I was attending a Christmas party over the holidays and, in the course of conversation, made the following statement:

“I can’t watch very many war movies anymore.”

My sister in-law,

The post Decorated Soldier Picks the Best, and Worst, War Movies appeared first on Hollywood in Toto.

(Review Source)