Fight Club
Jean-François (J.F.) Gariépy
(Review Source)
Freakonomics
Libertarian Agnostic

I was a big fan of the “Broken Windows Theory” explanation (popularized by Malcolm Gladwell) of why crime was greatly reduced in the 90’s; applauding Mayor Giuliani as the ideal implementer of the theory. But then I read “Freakonomics” and … Continue reading

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(Review Source)
Murray N. Rothbard (a.k.a. Mr. First Nighter)
A charming movie, directed by Jon Avnet, about the rural South, now and in the old days. Outstanding acting by Kathy Bates, Jessica Tandy and the rest of the cast. A paean to the old Southern way of life, funny and suspenseful. Even the feminism is not obnoxious, with Southern matron Kathy Bates learning to be more assertive and telling off some rude young punk girls. Based on an autobiographical novel by Alabama-born and raised Fannie Flagg, one of the charms of the movie is that all the Alabama characters, even the Ku Kluxers, are wonderful people, whereas the Georgians, not far across the border, are all nasty villains who beat their wives. And the Georgian Kluxers are real mean. Organized lesbians have been complaining that the lesbianism of the book is not made explicit in the movie. Tough.



Read the rest via The Irrepressible Rothbard pg. 423
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Murray N. Rothbard (a.k.a. Mr. First Nighter)
(”From Russia with Love” is briefly mentioned in this.)
The Heartbreak Kid. dir. by Elaine May. With Charles Grodin, Cybill Shepherd, Jeannie Berlin, and Eddie Albert. If, in the old adage, “it takes one to know one,” we can perhaps understand some of the brilliance with which the team of Nichols and May hilariously and acidulously satirized the typical conversation and thought-processes of New York-liberal-Jewish intellectuals in their great records of the 1950s and early 60s. Since then, Mike Nichols has gone on to ape the pretentiousness of the people he once satirized, leaving Elaine May to mine the comic vein alone. Her first movie, A New Leaf, was simply and happily hilarious, starring the great comedic talent of Walter Matthau, but lacked the old social bite of former days. In The Heartbreak Kid, Miss May returns to her old genre, and with the notable exception of Philip Roth, no one is as adept in exploring the cultural differences and conflicts between the Jewish and the goyishe worlds. Heartbreak Kid is a brilliantly crafted…

Read the rest via The Complete Libertarian Forum (1969-1984) Vol. 5.7, July 1973
(Review Source)
Murray N. Rothbard (a.k.a. Mr. First Nighter)
(”From Russia with Love” is briefly mentioned in this.)
Annie Hall, dir. by Woody Allen. With Allen and Diane Keaton.
This is Woody Allen’s best film to date. I went to this movie on my guard because of my fellow critics’ “assurances” that Annie Hall, at long last, transcended “mere humor” to acute social significance. But don’t you believe it; Annie Hall is a constant stream of hilarious, scintillating wit. The movie is totally ethnic; it sparkles with “in” ethnic references and local references to New York. As a matter of fact, the best way to approach Annie Hall is to be a Jewish intellectual from the West Side of Manhattan. But Outlanders seem to enjoy the film, too, although one sometimes wonders how. New Yorkers will particularly enjoy Woody’s blistering rending of Los Angeles life and culture…

Read the rest via The Complete Libertarian Forum (1969-1984) Vol. 10.8, August 1977
(Review Source)
Murray N. Rothbard (a.k.a. Mr. First Nighter)
(”From Russia with Love” is briefly mentioned in this.)
Zelig, dir. by and with Woody Allen.
In recent years, Woody has been a highly erratic filmmaker. After reaching a glorious peak with the hilarious and perceptive Annie Hall and especially Manhattan, Woody trended downward. Sunrise Memories I like more than most critics, but it was still far below Annie Hall and Manhattan. The last Allen opus, A Midsummer Night’s Sex Comedy, an hommage to Ingmar Bergman’s only worthwhile movie, the charming and early Smiles of a Summer Night, was simply atrocious. Not only was it not funny, it had no redeeming features, and was a torture to sit through. Its brief span seemed like many hours, if not weeks.
Zelig has been hailed by almost all critics as his masterpiece, and they have waxed rhapsodic over its technical brilliance in integrating Allen into a host of old documentary film clips of the 1920s. Well, the hell with technical. From the point of view of the movie consumer…

Read the rest via The Complete Libertarian Forum (1969-1984) Vol. 17.7–8, July–August 1983
(Review Source)
Frozen
Stefan Molyneux
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Frozen II
Stefan Molyneux
(Review Source)
Murray N. Rothbard (a.k.a. Mr. First Nighter)
The Oscars. About the TV show, the less said the better. It was dull, grim, boring, ugly, the least cinematic of the Oscar award programs. One longed for good old Bob Hope and his repetitious oneliners. As to the awards themselves, they were a titanic struggle between Rocky and Network, so close that even the knowledgeable Sidney Skolsky flubbed on three of his six major predictions on the winners. If justice had triumphed, All the President’s Men—by far the best movie of 1976—would have won in a walk, and Alan J. Pakula would have won for his excellent direction. But the producers of APM had made the grave tactical error of opening the film at the beginning, instead of toward the end, of the year, and Hollywood forgets. As it is, we should be thankful that Jason Robards won the Best Supporting Actor award for his role as Ben Bradlee in APB, the most subtle acting performance of the year.
Given the freeze-out of APM, the victory for Rocky was something to be cheered, not only for the film’s own substantial merits…

Read the rest via The Complete Libertarian Forum (1969-1984) Vol. 10.3, March 1977
(Review Source)
1791L (Back Row Film Reviews)
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